FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

ISIS beheadings, Mexican cartel beheadings—it’s pretty much the same deal. Parallels between the two evil institutions abound.
Well, as the cartels down there maintain, the drug trade is just supply for the demand up here; we’ve got unprecedented levels of rural and small-town heroin addiction. New England is riddled with it. There’s an enormous market for pills and powders and herbs that make our great American spiritual depression cease and desist for a short while. Hence the cartel feeding frenzy.
Drug War
“Sicario” is a well-told tale of one attempt to stem the tide of drugs and violence pouring in here from down there. Ultimately, complete drug-flow stoppage won’t happen via CIA, FBI, and paramilitary teams, but through 12-step addiction programs and personal and spiritual cultivation. But that’s a different movie.
Still, it’s interesting to pick up the drug war rock and see what’s crawling around under it. That’s exactly what “Sicario” does. “Sicario” is Steven Soderbergh’s “Traffic” on steroids. It’s got some disturbing imagery you won’t be able to unsee; it’s full of very bad hombres. And the “good guys,” well, the cynicism level of the CIA is like hydrochloric acid. But it’s a dude film; dudes will appreciate it. And the cast is killer.
And That British Chick Is Pretty Great
Emily Blunt, that is. As door-kicker No. 1 on an FBI bust, agent Kate Macer (Blunt) roll-ducks a shotgun blast and puts the shooter down, whereupon her partner (Daniel Kaluuya) discovers a plastic bag peeking through the shotgunned hole in the drywall behind her.
Daniel Kaluuya stars as Reggie Wayne in “Sicario.” (Richard Foreman Jr/Lionsgate)
Guess what’s hiding in there? It’s a stunningly high body-count drywall morgue in a suburban Arizona house. The octopus-like arms of the cartels have grown long.
Macer’s a no-nonsense, by-the-book, morally upright FBI field agent whose ringing idealism puts her squarely in the function of stand-in for the audience.
Emily Blunt got this role because of her immensely believable, perfect-American-accented macho warrior work with Tom Cruise in “Edge of Tomorrow,” where her soulful blue eyes, power jawline and cleft chin, and the fact that she was heretofore a Shakespearean kind of girly-girl, gave her a magnetic je ne sais quoi.
Emily Blunt stars as idealistic FBI agent Kate Macer in “Sicario.” (Richard Foreman Jr/Lionsgate)
Kate Auditions
Interviews ensue in the wake of the Arizona mayhem. They like Kate’s style. Who does? We’re not sure, but it looks like a fantasy football interagency task force of alpha-dog operators is being cherry-picked to follow up on the drywall morgue situation. Macer’s the best kidnapping specialist. But is that really why they want her on the team?
The main auditioner is one Matt Graver (Josh Brolin), a rules-and-formalities eschewing, beach-sandals-wearing, gum-snapping bro with perfect hair and a killer smile. He’s a “Defense Department contractor” (sure he is). Talk about your snake and lady-charmer. Brolin was born to play this kind of slick, boyishly charming manly-man.
Josh Brolin stars as Matt Graver in “Sicario.” (Richard Foreman Jr/Lionsgate)
Macer is expertly schmoozed, bamboozled, and flattered into believing she’s needed on this op because she’s so awesome. She’s still naively seeing bad guys versus law enforcement as black-and-white, but Graver is clearly very, very gray. We highly suspect her idealism is in for a rude awakening.
Right about now, someone who might be the titular “sicario” shows up. That would be Alejandro (Benicio Del Toro). “Sicario” is Spanish slang for hitman. But Alejandro claims to be a “former Mexican prosecutor” (sure he is). Whoever he is, he carries deadly gravitas.
Mexico
Eventually, the crack agent team (no pun intended) travels down to Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, to snare one minor cartel boss (linked to the Arizona incident), in order to smoke out an even bigger one. Juárez—you don’t want to go there. Nightmarish images hang off bridges in those parts.
Which brings us to a topnotch set piece: Once they collar the small-fry boss and start heading back across the border (accompanied by a substantial motorcade of Federales), a massive traffic jam sets like cement; the Americans are suddenly sitting ducks.
Cars are spotted, inching forward, packed to the gills with face-tattooed bad hombres packing military-grade hardware. Unfortunately for los hombres, the American convoy contains U.S. Army Delta Force operators, tier-one CIA field-spooks, and one tough FBI chick. Which is like putting a feral dog pack up against dogfight-trained pit bulls. The tension winds tight as a steel winch—dudes will enjoy the ensuing spec ops versus cartel henchmen smackdown.
Escalation
There are tunnels, illegals, and shady deals, with Macer running around trying to figure it all out, and grinning Graver acting like a camp counselor: “Stick around, learn something.”
Emily Blunt stars as idealistic FBI agent Kate Macer in “Sicario.” (Richard Foreman Jr/Lionsgate)
And as the film throttles up, mystery man Alejandro’s story takes center stage. He’s an independent operative looking for revenge. The CIA benefits from turning him loose, since (to continue the canine metaphors) he’s a bloodhound crossed with a pit bull, looking to settle a score. With whom, we’re not sure, but you can bet it’s someone the CIA wants dead.
Benicio Del Toro stars as Alejandro in “Sicario.” (Richard Foreman Jr/Lionsgate)
Always unpredictable and unnerving, Del Toro’s Alejandro is riveting and complex. He shows us the humanity in the predator, the nightmares haunting his sleep, and the tenderness for the vulnerable female agent who reminds him of someone very close, taken away too soon.
Wolves, Not Dogs
The ominous statement by Alejandro is that the world has become a place where only wolves can survive. The cartels are the wolves; the government operators who used to be sheepdogs are now also often wolves. And the wolves take advantage of the chickens.
The quicker the chickens stop pecking at the cartel chicken feed, the quicker the drug war wolves become a non-issue. Just say no. That’ll help (sure it will). But seriously, when it comes to war—Vietnam War, drug war, whatever (war is war)—the last monologue of “Platoon” says it best: “I think now, looking back, we did not fight the enemy; we fought ourselves. And the enemy was in us.”
MORE:‘White House Down’ Dies Hard
‘Sicario’Director: Denis VillenueuveStarring: Emily Blunt, Josh Brolin, Benicio Del Toro, Victor GarberRunning time: 2 hours, 1 minuteRelease date: Oct. 2 (Limited: Sept. 18)Rated R3.5 stars out of 5

Migrant families sleep on the sea front in tents on August 31, 2015 in Kos, Greece. Migrants from many parts of the Middle East and African nations continue to flood into Europe before heading from Athens, north to the Macedonian border. Since the beginning of 2015 the number of migrants using the so-called ‘Balkans route’ has exploded with migrants arriving in Greece from Turkey and then travelling on through Macedonia and Serbia before entering the EU via Hungary. The number of people leaving their homes in war torn countries such as Syria, marks the largest migration of people since World War II. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

Guatemala’s President Otto Perez Molina, center, leaves a press conference followed by his spokesman Jorge Ortega, in Guatemala City, Monday, Aug. 31, 2015. The head of Guatemala’s congress says that lawmakers would decide on Tuesday whether to lift Perez Molina’s immunity from prosecution in a corruption case, as recommended by a legislative committee. (AP Photo/Luis Soto)

Harris County District Attorney Devon Anderson explains outside state district court, on Monday, Aug. 31, 2015, in Houston, how Sheriff’s Deputy Darren Goforth was gunned down. Shannon Miles has been charged with capital murder in the death. Miles first shot the 10-year veteran in the back of the head and fired multiple times, authorities said Monday. (AP Photo/Pat Sullivan)Venus Williams of the United States returns a shot against Monica Puig of Puerto Rico during her Women’s Singles First Round match on Day One of the 2015 US Open at the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on August 31, 2015 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City. (Clive Brunskill/Getty Images)

A policeman (C) secures an area as people offer prayers at the reopened Erawan shrine in central Bangkok on August 31, 2015. Thai police said they had found bomb-making materials over the weekend in a second apartment following the arrest of a suspect over the Bangkok shrine bombing that left 20 people dead. (Nicolas Asfouri/AFP/Getty Images)Democratic Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at the Democratic National Committee summer meeting on August 28, 2015 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Could Clinton or her aides be in legal jeopardy if they sent classified information over unsecure email while she was secretary of state? Experts in government secrecy law see almost no possibility of criminal action in the Clinton case, given the evidence that has so far been made public. Clinton’s case appears to differ markedly from those of other prominent government officials who got in trouble for mishandling classified information, including former CIA director David Petraeus, who gave top secret information to his paramour, and former CIA director John Deutch, who took highly classified material home with him. (Adam Bettcher/Getty Images)

Monserrat Gutierrez, dressed as vocaloid Kasane Teto, rests on a green lawn as she waits to compete in the individual cosplayer category costume contest, during the Yuukai Expo, in Managua, Nicaragua, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015. The expo is celebrating its second annual one day event for the lover of Japanese culture and anime. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

Ukrainian protesters, one using police riot equipment, clash with police after a vote to give greater powers to the east, outside the Parliament, Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, Aug. 31, 2015. The Ukrainian parliament has given preliminary approval to a controversial constitutional amendment that would provide greater powers to separatist regions in the east. Hundreds of people gathered in front of the parliament to protest against the amendment. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

Croatia’s Marin Cilic returns a shot to Argentina’s Guido Pella during their 2015 US Open Mens Singles round 1 match at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York on August 31, 2015. AFP PHOTO/JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)Chinese popular human rights activist Chen Guangcheng poses in Paris on August 31, 2015. Chen, who enraged authorities by exposing forced abortions and sterilizations under China’s one-child-only policy, escaped from house arrest in April 2012 and fled to the US embassy days ahead of a visit by Hillary Clinton. (Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images)Migrants walk on a platform after arriving from Budapest at Vienna’s Westbahnhof railway station Austria, on August 31, 2015. After arriving at Vienna’s Westbahnhof, many of the migrants then boarded a train to Salzburg, while others climbed on to another one headed for Munich, with police looking on, an AFP correspondent at the scene said. (Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images)A performer in costume at the Notting Hill Carnival on August 31, 2015 in London, England. (Daniel C Sims/Getty Images)

The truth is out there. On Twitter, that is. The Central Intelligence Agency has used the end-of-the-year silly season to finally come clean about UFOs. Anyone hoping for little green…

Tagged under:

While still battling the government over leaked information in the scandal over former CIA director David Petraeus, Jill Kelley has met with Pope Francis and has bought a home for…

WASHINGTON — CIA Director John Brennan on Thursday acknowledged the use of “abhorrent” tactics by the spy agency — but he said harsh interrogations provided “useful intelligence,” a day after…

Tagged under:
TOP