FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

A Kim Jong-un parody dance video, reportedly make by a Chinese college student, has gone viral.
The video features a fake Kim Jong-un, dancing and fighting his way through a series of very bizarre situations.
The North Korean leader is seen kicked to the ground by President Obama, parading through a ballet studio, and much much more, all to the sound of a Chinese pop song by the group the ‘Chopstick Brothers’.
While most people find the video hilarious, the North Koreans are not amused.
In fact, they are so unhappy with the video, they apparently have asked the Chinese government to take steps to remove it.
Obviously, the Chinese Government was unable to do so.
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The full video can be seen below on YouTube. What is your favorite scene?

Pumpkin spice is over, dead. If you are still doing whatever one does with pumpkin spice (eating? drinking? snorting with $100 bills?), you are like that guy who is so stoked about the U2 concert he saw last night. You might as well catch the next plane to Pyongyang, because you and the tyrannical dictator Kim Jong Un are the very last people on the planet who think pumpkin spice is awesome.Everyone else, everyone else who matters, is totally into salted caramel. Which, unlike the garbage spice pumpkin spice, is enjoyed throughout the year — and isn't just a lame marketing gimmick trotted out to appeal to Thanksgiving shoppers and people who smoke a ton of weed. That is, at least, the gist of an unsolicited email I received this afternoon. According to new data from the self-described "experts" at health-tracker app MyFitnessPal, the trend of pumpkin spice "MIGHT BE FIZZLING OUT" (emphasis added). Last year, according to these experts, humans consumed 7.3 percent less pumpkin spice-flavored items than the year before. Meanwhile, salted caramel as a thing is "booming," having enjoyed a 7 percent spike since the beginning of 2014. Totally incidentally, I cashed out my 401(k) and bought 40,000 gallons of salted caramel flavoring that I'm looking to sell at a totally reasonable price. — This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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No birthday party for Kim Jong-un this year

Thursday, 08 January 2015 by

Exactly one year ago, flamboyant NBA hall of fame star Dennis Rodman stepped up to a microphone in the center ring of a North Korean basketball court and sang ‘Happy…

A North Korean student, the son of an aide to Kim Jong-un’s executed uncle, is on the run in France after evading an abduction attempt by Pyongyang’s agents, according to foreign diplomats.

“There was an attempt to force him to go back, but it is thought he escaped and is somewhere in France. There is an attempt to locate him but he hasn’t been found yet,” said one diplomatic source.

The architecture student, referred to only by his surname Han, vanished from Paris last month. He is believed to be the son of a close confidant of Jang Song-thaek, Mr Kim’s once powerful uncle who was executed last December on treason charges. His father was killed recently as part of the purge of Jang’s allies.

“Since the 1980s, when the regime changes and someone is executed and his relatives and friends and family are studying abroad, they are brought home,” said Park Sung-jin, Paris correspondent for Yonhap, South Korea’s biggest news agency. “If Han returned he would likely be kept in a political prison or executed. That has happened many times. He knew what was awaiting him, so he escaped.”

The student’s disappearance has lifted the lid on the murky ties between France and the communist regime.

Despite having no official diplomatic relations with the dictatorship, France has invited North Korean students from privileged backgrounds to study architecture in Paris since 2002.

Mr Han was studying at the prestigious Ecole Nationale Superieure d’Architecture de Paris-La Villette. He had left North Korea for the French capital in 2012, along with nine other North Koreans, five of whom are posted at another architecture school in Belleville. They are in their third year of a five-year course. “We didn’t decide out of the blue to take on students from North Korea, the decision was made by the French culture ministry to whom we answer. This is over our heads,” said a head teacher at the La Villette school, who recalled her surprise when the first batch of students turned up wearing badges with the portrait of their “Dear Leader”.

The students were kept under close surveillance, she said. “There is often an Asian man in a three-piece suit waiting in the courtyard, checking up on attendance and if they get good results,” she added. “When one failed part of his exam and was sent home, a representative from the North Korean delegation in Paris wanted to take it in his place. We had to explain that wasn’t possible.”

After long denying its existence, the French foreign ministry confirmed that a “cooperation programme” involving “students from North Korea trained in architecture in Paris” had been in place for the past decade.

It had no further comment.

The programme was set up by Jean-Noel Juttet, a former French ambassador to Japan, who said he was asked by the French foreign ministry to find ways of “maintaining contact between the two countries”.

Homing in on education, he said the French suggested courses in “priority sectors, like medicine, food or construction” but that the North Koreans were interested in only one field: architecture.

“That was a request that came all the way from the top. They insisted so much that we ended up agreeing,” he told Street Press, an online news site that first uncovered the student programme.

The students are supposed to help transform Pyongyang’s skyline with new, cutting-edge architectural designs, such as the Ryugyong hotel, a 1,000ft building completed in 2012. They have reportedly been behind designs for a new ice skating rink, dolphinarium and sports centre opened last year to help North Korea become a “new society of leisure”.

Architecture is not Kim Jong-un’s only area of interest in France. In April, it also emerged that the Emmental-loving despot had ordered three officials to attend a crash course in cheese-making at a dairy school in eastern France – reportedly because he was dissatisfied with his country’s attempts at dairy production. The school politely declined.

By midday on Friday, more than 300,000 people in China had seen the film about a plot to assassinate Kim Jong-un of North Korea and the reviews, by and large, were favorable.

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North Korea on Saturday proposed a joint investigation with the U.S. into the hacking attack against Sony Pictures Entertainment, warning of “serious” consequences if Washington rejects a probe that it believes would prove Pyongyang had nothing to do with the cyberattack.

The proposal was seen by analysts as a typical ploy by the North to try to show that it is sincere, even though it knows the U.S. would never accept its offer for a joint investigation.

U.S. officials blame North Korea for the hacking, citing the tools used in the Sony attack and previous hacks linked to the North, and have vowed to respond. The break-in resulted in the disclosure of tens of thousands of confidential Sony emails and business files, and escalated to threats of terror attacks against U.S. movie theaters that caused Sony to cancel the Christmas Day release of “The Interview,” a comedy about a plot to assassinate North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

On Saturday, an unidentified North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman in Pyongyang proposed the joint investigation with the U.S., saying the North knows how to prove it’s not responsible for the hacking. He also said Washington was slandering Pyongyang by spreading unfounded rumors.

“The U.S. should bear in mind that it will face serious consequences in case it rejects our proposal for joint investigation and presses for what it called countermeasures while finding fault with” North Korea, the spokesman said in a statement carried by Pyongyang’s official Korean Central News Agency, or KCNA.

“We have a way to prove that we have nothing to do with the case without resorting to torture, as the CIA does,” he said, adding that the U.S. lacks any specific evidence tying North Korea to the hacking.

The White House had no immediate comment Saturday.

Koh Yu-hwan, a professor at Seoul’s Dongguk University, called the North’s proposal a “typical” tactic the country has taken in similar disputes with rival countries. In 2010, North Korea proposed a joint investigation after a South Korean-led international team concluded that the North was behind a torpedo attack that killed 46 South Korean sailors, though Pyongyang denied its involvement. South Korea rejected the North’s offer for the joint probe.

“They are now talking about a joint investigation because they think there is no conclusive evidence,” Koh said. “But the U.S. won’t accede to a joint investigation for the crime.”

On Friday, President Barack Obama declared that Sony “made a mistake” in shelving the satirical film about a plot to assassinate the North Korean leader, and pledged that the U.S. would respond “in a place and manner and time that we choose” to the hacking attack on Sony that led to the movie’s withdrawal.

“I wish they had spoken to me first. … We cannot have a society in which some dictator someplace can start imposing censorship,” Obama said at a year-end news conference, speaking of executives at Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Sony said it had had no choice but to cancel distribution of the movie because theaters were refusing to show it.

U.S. options for acting against North Korea are limited. The U.S. already has severe trade sanctions in place, and there is no appetite for military action. Even if investigators could identify and prosecute the individual hackers believed responsible, there’s no guarantee that any located are overseas would ever see a U.S. courtroom. Hacking back at North Korean targets by U.S. government experts could encourage further attacks against American targets.

North Korea and the U.S. remain in a technical state of war because the 1950-53 Korean War ended with an armistice, not a peace treaty. The rivals also are locked in an international standoff over the North’s nuclear and missile programs and its alleged human rights abuses.

Earlier Saturday, North Korea angrily denounced a move by the United Nations to bring its human rights record before the Security Council and renewed its threat to further bolster its nuclear deterrent against what it called a hostile policy by the U.S. to topple its ruling regime.

Pyongyang “vehemently and categorically rejects” the resolution passed by the U.N. General Assembly that could open the door for its leaders, including Kim Jong-un, to be hauled before the International Criminal Court for crimes against humanity, according to a Foreign Ministry statement carried by KCNA.

The Security Council is due to meet Monday to discuss Pyongyang’s human rights situation for the first time.

The meeting caps almost a year of international pressure, and even though ally China could use its veto power to block any action against the North, the nonbinding resolution has broad support in the General Assembly and has drawn unusually strong and vitriolic protests from Pyongyang.

Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images

WASHINGTON — — President Barack Obama said Friday that Sony Pictures Entertainment “made a mistake” in deciding to shelve a film about a plot to assassinate North Korean Leader Kim Jong Un even though the studio suffered significant damage in a hack attack the FBI blames on the secretive Communist regime.

“I wish they had spoken to me first,” Obama said of Sony executives at a year-end news conference in which he said, “we cannot have a society in which some dictatorship someplace can start imposing censorship …”

Envisioning other potential flashpoints, he summoned situations in which dictators “start seeing a documentary that they don’t like or news reports that they don’t like.”

“We will respond” to the attack,’ he added, although he offered no details.

The president spoke a few hours after the FBI formally accused the North Korean government of being responsible for the devastating hacking attack against Sony, providing the most detailed accounting to date of a hugely expensive break-in that could lead to a U.S. response.

The FBI said in a statement it that it now has enough evidence to conclude that North Korea was behind the punishing breach, which resulted in the disclosure of tens of thousands of leaked emails and other materials.

“North Korea’s actions were intended to inflict significant harm on a U.S. business and suppress the right of American citizens to express themselves. Such acts of intimidation fall outside the bounds of acceptable state behaviour,” the statement said.

The FBI’s statement cited, among other factors, technical similarities between the Sony break-in and past “malicious cyber activity” linked directly to North Korea, including a prior cyberattack against South Korean banks and media.

Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty ImagesWorkers remove a poster-banner for The Interview from a billboard in Hollywood.

A group identifying itself as Guardians of Peace has taken responsibility for the Sony breach, which was reported in late November and involved the use of destructive malware that caused the studio to take its entire computer network offline left thousands of computers inoperable and “significantly disrupted the company’s business operations,” the FBI said.

The break-in has had wide-ranging ramifications for the studio, spilling into public view candid and confidential discussions among executives and leading to lawsuits from those who say their personal and financial data was exposed online. This week, the cyber-attack escalated with terrorist threats against movie theatres that planned to show the movie “The Interview,” a comedy starring James Franco and Seth Rogen that for months has been condemned by the North Korean government.

In response to the threats, Sony cancelled the Christmas Day release of the film — a comedy about a plot to assassinate Kim Jong Un and said it had no further plans to distribute it.

After Sony shelved the film’s release, hackers sent a new email praising the studio’s decision as “very wise” and saying its data would be safe “as long as you make no more trouble.” The message warned the studio to “never” release the film “in any form,” including on DVD. The email was confirmed Friday by a person close to the studio who wasn’t authorized to speak publicly about the matter and requested anonymity. An FBI spokesman said authorities were aware of the email and were investigating.

The Motion Picture Association of America called the Sony attack a “despicable, criminal act” that threatened the lives of thousands of people in the film and television industries.

North Korea has denied responsibility but earlier this month referred to the cyberattack as a “righteous deed.” A North Korean diplomat to the United Nations, Kim Un Chol, declined to comment Friday about the FBI’s accusations.

Obama administration officials had until Friday declined to openly blame North Korea but had said they were weighing various options for a response. The statement Friday did not reveal what options were being considered but did say the government would look to “impose costs and consequences.”

At first glance, the options for a U.S. response seem limited. Bringing the shadowy hackers to justice appears a distant prospect. A U.S. cyberretaliation against North Korea would risk a dangerous escalation. And North Korea is already targeted by a raft of sanctions over its nuclear weapons program.

The FBI did not indicate whether it has identified any individual hackers who might be culpable. In May, the Justice Department announced indictments against five Chinese military officers accused of vast cyberespionage against American corporate interests, but none of those defendants has yet to set foot in an American courtroom.

Don’t expect a bootleg DVD of “The Interview” to be on North Koreans’ gift lists. The Seth Rogen/James Franco comedy about the assassination of Kim Jong Un was pulled from…

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