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Some Olympic stories start from tragedy and lead to success. And, then there are those with the opposite experience. Suzy Favor Hamilton was a three-time Olympian making celebrity appearances but she also went under the name Kelly Lundy, a Las Vegas escort making $600 an hour for her services.
In what turned out to be in part the result of a misdiagnosis of depression and a prescription for antidepressants, Hamilton led a double life in Las Vegas while her husband Mark Hamilton was left to take care of their daughter Kylie, according to ABC News.

Through good times and bad
A photo posted by Suzy Favor Hamilton (@favorhamilton) on Sep 10, 2015 at 7:47pm PDT

Unfortunately, her experience was a partial result of Hamilton being diagnosed with bipolar disorder. However, the Olympian is now moving forward with her life since her secret was exposed in 2012. In her new book, “Fast Girl,” which will be released on Sept. 14, she describes her journey to recovery.
“The whole entire world was watching me,” Hamilton said of the 2000 Sydney Games, as her Olympic dreams were dashed. “That dream of having an Olympic medal was gone and instead of finishing the race, like most runners would, I told myself ‘just fall’ and I fell immediately, it just happened like that.”
Following the revelation of her secret life, Favor-Hamilton was dropped from her sponsorship deals with Disney and the Rock ’n’ Roll race series. She returned to the public’s eye by running the 2014 L.A. Marathon as a charity runner and opening up on her website’s blog, according to SI.
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LAS VEGAS (AP) — A former personal aide to B.B. King is suing three of the late blues legend's daughters in Las Vegas over their allegations that King was poisoned before he died in May.
Myron Johnson's civil lawsuit filed Thursday in Clark County District Court accuses Karen Williams, Patty King and Rita Washington of seven causes of action including defamation, slander, libel and conspiracy.
Patty King declined to comment Friday.Read more on NewsOK.com

Great news for all the Britney Spears fans out there: the "Work B**ch" singer has just extended her Las Vegas contract. So if you haven't made it out to the land of casinos and hotels to see her play (or even if you have), you'll have two more years' worth of chances. That's right, two years. The 33-year-old performer made the big announcement at her show on Wednesday night at the Axis at Planet Hollywood. "I have some big news tonight," Spears said to the crowd. "Usually, I get you guys to help me count to three, but tonight I want you to help me count to two because I’m going to be in Vegas for two more years!”Lucky for us, the whole announcement is on Instagram. Just check it out below! Two more years!!!!!!!!! A video posted by Britney Spears (@britneyspears) on Sep 9, 2015 at 11:05pm PDTAlso on HuffPost: For a constant stream of entertainment news and discussion, follow HuffPost Entertainment on Viber. — This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Earlier this week I was privileged to sit in the audience of a panel entitled “The Best City in the World May not Be a City At All” at SXSW V2V. As someone who’s lived in multiple cities and yet hasn’t really found one geographic location I ADORE this as a topic. I believe that the reason I live or stay in a city is due to its people and its opportunities. Apparently I’m not alone in this thinking. But first let me tell you why I feel this way.

Feeling those geographic limitations
I’ve lived three places (so far); Suburban Minnesota, Downtown Chicago, and Downtown Dallas. I knew from a very young age that I was not fit for the suburban culture and probably would never be. (Sorry future kids – you’re not getting a backyard). This has nothing to do with the dislike of mowing lawns or hordes of kids but rather it’s the sounds and energy. When I moved from Chicago to Dallas I moved to the loudest area of town possible. And it was still dead to me. But I got my high off the people and environments I was working around. One of the very first people I met in Dallas shared an energy just like mine. (His name is Trey Bowles in case you’re curious). We both had “get it done now” & “there is always more time in a day” attitudes. I liked that. I soon met a few more people like this who shared the energy and sass I needed to thrive.
However, as I’ve now been a resident for over a year I’m craving a higher high. This has lead me to travel more. In the past month I’ve been in Chicago, Nashville, Miami, Las Vegas. Next month I will travel to Minnesota (Hi parents!) and Chicago. And in the month after, Las Vegas and NYC. The environment and the high I get from Dallas is still there; I’m just going through a “rejuvenate & build bigger” stage. This leads me to work on projects for Dallas which will bring it national attention. (announcing soon….) Because although Dallas to me isn’t SUPER geographically exciting, it’s home (for now) and I want to pump as much energy into it as I can. Which is one of the major reasons I recently took the position as VP of Programming at the Dallas Entrepreneur Center. This position gives me the opportunity to build the culture up, interact with hundreds of people and connect with those, like me, working for the high that cannot be provided by a typical city.
Finding a fit in your city
Now, back to this “the best city may not be a city at all” feeling. To me, and to a huge population of people, we don’t need to be tied down to a specific geographic location; our lives are digital. Our cities, rather, are phones, computers, people, conversations, laughter, music, noises, etc. It’s the components that make up a city or culture, instead, that we are attracted to.
While watching this panel made up of three New Yorkers – Jey Van-Sharp, Helen Todd, and Jim Hopkinson— I felt at home. (no offense Martin Waxman – Toronto just isn’t my jam but holla!) They had the energy and drive I needed. They are my city. New York has the lights and sounds and geographically would work for me yes – BUT it doesn’t have other key components I need in “my city”. That’s why I don’t actually live there, but the people – oh do I love them. I’m sassy, I’m loud and I’m a get it done person – sounds a little like NYC huh?
So the bottom line to this whole rant of an editorial is that your city may not be a city at all. Rather, you should find the items, people, and noises that make you tick – assemble those and call that your city.
If you’re curious, my ideal geographic city combines water with skyscrapers (and a lot of both). What’s yours?

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To say that Uber has had a little bit of trouble setting up shop in Nevada is a glaring understatement. On October 24, 2014 we wrote that Las Vegas would finally be getting Uber after waiting for what seemed like ages. However, the very next day on October 25, we reported that a Nevada judge had effectively halted Uber’s expansion.
Sure, Uber has encountered this kind of resistance from state authorities before and they weren’t going to give up on the Silver State. To that end it was today announced that the Nevada legislature has approved a bill that would allow ridesharing platforms like Uber and Lyft to operate in Nevada.
This is definitely exciting for residents of Nevada who have been trying to get Uber in their state for a long time now. However, the bill won’t mean anything if Governor Brian Sandoval doesn’t sign it. Granted, he is expected to sign it into law, but then again the tide of politics can seemingly shift any direction at any time.
According to Sean Whaley and Sandra Chereb of the Las Vegas Review-Journal, “the bill is effective upon passage and approval but companies must apply to the Nevada Public Utilities Commission before they can begin operating”. Whaley and Chereb go on to say that the bill wasn’t devoid of hefty amounts of confusion though.
“The original plan was to approve regulations to let Uber and Lyft operate in one measure, Assembly Bill [AB] 176, and authorize the tax levy in AB175. But the assemply only concurred in AB175 and rejected AB176. The effect of the action was to remove a provision that would have had the companies regulated by the Nevada Transportation Authority instead of the PUC,” they explain.
In short, it’s messy. It’s especially messy when you compare it to other cities like Fargo, North Dakota that Uber has expanded to. They took the time to implement rideshare legislation first and then get Uber to expand to their city.
So, while Nevada has maybe done it a bit backwards, they’re at least making headway finally. However you have to remember it’s equally probable that Uber gets approved or gets the axe once again. We’ll keep our fingers crossed that the state of Nevada finds a way to coexist with ridesharing platforms at the end of the day though.
Image Credit: Uber Facebook page

There aren’t many women who can steal a pop princess’ thunder without even trying. But, as Britney Spears discovered at her New Year’s Eve soiree in Las Vegas, extending an…

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